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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 1 found in the catalog.

Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 1

Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 1

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  • 37 Currently reading

Published by National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Aircraft gas-turbines.,
  • Aerofoils.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby W.H. Atkinson, M.A. Cyr, R.R. Strange.
    SeriesCR -- 168297., NASA contractor report -- NASA CR-168297.
    ContributionsCyr, M. A., Strange, R. R., Lewis Research Center., Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Group. Engineering Division.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17831793M

    the gas turbine manufacturers are making effort to achieve much tighter clearance, there is an increasingly demand for reliable experimental data with smaller tip gaps. Completely from experimental perspective, the present study aimed to address the wall-to-gas temperature ratio effect on turbine blade tip heat transfer. The first-of-its-kind. Numerical calculation of conjugate heat transfer was carried out to study the effect of combined film and swirl cooling at the leading edge of a gas turbine vane with a cooling chamber inside. Two cooling chambers (C1 and C2 cases) were specially designed to generate swirl in the chamber, which could enhance overall cooling effectiveness at the leading edge. A simple Cited by: 2.

      Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft Engines [NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft EnginesFormat: Paperback. modeling of film cooled gas turbine blade and evaluation of cooling effectiveness and reduction of heat flux due to blade cooling. II. THERMODYNAMIC MODELING Figure 1 illustrates the thermal model for the combined convective/film cooled surface. Hot gas flows along the outer surface of a cooled interval of length L and height s. Coolant.

    (1) where A m is the axial flow area. The stress levels increase with the square of the speed and linearly with the mass flow. The blade Mach number (also commonly known as the U/C ratio), is defined by: (2) The blade Mach number provides a better understanding of the situation. This blade Mach number does not differ a lot between different. Figure 1: Thermograms without and with pulse heating for: a) kW blade, b) kW blades c) intact and ruptured 1,4 kW blade, and d) detal of ruptured 1,4 kW blade. 3 IMAGE FILTERING BASED ON THE THERMAL GRADIENT APPROACH There are several very successful approaches of filtering and enhancing anomalies.


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Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 1 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Heat flux sensors available for installation in the hot section airfoils of advanced aircraft gas turbine engines were developed. Two heat flux sensors were designed, fabricated, calibrated, and tested.

Measurement techniques are compared in an atmospheric pressure combustor rig test. Get this from a library. Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 1. [W H Atkinson; M A Cyr; R R Strange; Lewis Research Center,; Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Group. Engineering Division.]. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Atkinson, W.H.

Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 1 (OCoLC) Material Type. "Turbine Blade and Vane Heat Flux Sensor Developmentu; and a pre-HOST effort, NAS, "Advanced Hi gh Temperature Heat Flux Sensor Development".

The objective of each of these contracts is to develop heat flux sensors for use on gas turbine engine hot section Size: KB. NASA/TM— 1 Thin Film Heat Flux Sensor Development for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) Systems John D. Wrbanek, Gustave C. Fralick, Gary W.

Hunter, and Dongming Zhu National Aeronautics and Space Administration Glenn Research Center Cleveland, Ohio Kimala L. Laster Sierra Lobo, Inc. Cleveland, Ohio Jose M. Turbine Vane External Heat Transfer Volume!1. the flow in and about the turbine blade passages. These components are a source of aerodynamic loads and losses that can control the overall machine viscous boundary layer development in the N-Sanalysis.

In comparing the vis-File Size: 8MB. Atkinson has written: 'Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 2' -- subject(s): Heat transfer coefficients, Cross flow, Turbine blades, Heat flux, Vanes 'Development of. Dunn, M. (b) “Time-Resolved Heat-Flux Measurements for the Rotor Blade of a TFE–2 HP Turbine,” in Convective Heat Transfer and Film Cooling in Turbomachinery, von Karman Inst.

for Fluid Dynamics, Rhode Saint by: Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 2 [microform] / by W.H. Atkinson, M.A. Cyr, R. Comparison of predicted and measured turbine vane rough surface heat transfer [microform] / R.J.

Boyle, Turbine vane external heat transfer [microform]: final report; Heat transfer in gas turbines [microform] / Vijay K. Garg.

Atkinson, Development of Heat Flux Sensors for Turbine Airfoils and Combustion Liners, NASA Conference Publication N, pp. 45–55, Modelling Thermal Behaviour of Turbomachinery. Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development phase 1 / by: Atkinson, W.

H., et al. Published: () Constitutive modeling for isotropic materials (HOST) Published: (). Inferencing Component Maps of Gas Turbine Engine Using Bayesian Framework. Turbine blade and vane heat flux sensor development, phase 1.

results regarding turbine blade dynamics acquired. The effects of using an insert Heat Flux Microsensor (HFM) versus an HFM deposited directly on a turbine blade to measure heat flux in a transonic cascade are investigated. The HFM is a thin-film sensor, mm (”) in diameter (for an insert gage, including the housing) which measures heat flux and surface temperature.

The. Convective Heat Transfer and Aerodynamics in Axial Flow Turbines X. A., Soechting, F. O., MacArthur, C. D., and Meininger, M.,“High Pressure Turbine Vane Annular Cascade Heat Flux and Aerodynamic Measurements With Comparisons to Prediction,” ASME Paper No.

GT Influence of Vane/Blade Spacing on the Heat Flux for a Cited by: turbine vane and blade to investigate the accuracy of static pressure (Mach number), mass flow rate, and other features. Finally, Task 5 involved analyses of heat transfer of the turbine cooled blade by thermal conjugation of the internal and external fields of a first-stage turbine blade consisting of convection heat transfer and thermal File Size: KB.

DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF GAS TURBINE ROTOR BLADE USING FINITE ELEMENT METHOD AHMED ABDULHUSSEIN JABBAR1, A. RAI2, P. RAVINDER REEDY3 & MAHMOOD HASAN DAKHIL4 1,2,4Department of Mechanical Engineering, SHIATS -DU, Allahabad, India 3Department Professor & Head of Mechanical nya.

Amaral et al. applied conjugate heat transfer method using 1-D aero-thermal model based on friction and heat transfer correlations for lifetime prediction of a high-pressure turbine blade operating at a very high inlet temperature.

Their CHT method is validated on two test cases: a gas turbine rotor blade without cooling and one with five Cited by: Shaped holes are considered as an effective solution to enhance gas turbine film-cooling performance, as they allow to increase the coolant mass-flux, while limiting the detrimental lift-off phenomena.

A great amount of work has been carried out in past years on basic flat plate configurations while a reduced number of experimental works deals with a quantitative Cited by: 2.

Aerodynamic design of a gas turbine was scaled back to test turbine size. The blade design could be evaluated and modified using several different in house codes: MAC1, used for meanline design, 0 vane inlet 1 vane outlet 2 blade outlet u tangential a axial r radial * total state.

denotes quantities per unit time. Further downstream, where the temperature is somewhat lower, it may suffice with internal cooling. Since the physics within a gas turbine is very complex, simplified approaches are often used at initial stages of the development of the new components.

In this model, the thermal stresses in a stator blade with internal cooling are analyzed. Heat Transfer Analysis of Gas Turbine Blade through Cooling Holes by K Hari Brahmaiah, Kumar In advanced gas turbines, the turbine blade operated temperature is for above the melting point of blade material.

A sophisticated cooling scheme must be developed for continuous safe operation of gas turbines with high Size: KB.more efficient cooling. A turbine blade operates typically at temperature ° K, pressure Mpa and in addition to that it rotates at the speeds greater than rpm.

So, efficient cooling mechanisms are needed to improve blade life and overall efficiency of .For the flow mea- Table 2 Blade configurations Number of blades 16 Chord length (C) mm Axial chord (C x) mm Pitch to chord ratio Hub (p/C) Mean () Tip Aspect ratio (l/C) Spacing between vane and blade 34 mm (C) Blade inlet/exit angle β 1 = /β 2 =− Turning angle Mean tip clearance (t)3 Cited by: